Want the Job? Don't Overlook Your Personal Description

This week on the Nomad blog, we're excited to interview a member of our Operations team, Eleanor Hershey! Her background lies in recruiting engineers and CEOs, and now she's busy supporting amazing doctors, nurses, and employers on Nomad.

From working closely with clinicians and the employers who hired them, Eleanor learned a key insight:

Clinicians who have well-written personal descriptions tend to get the most engagement from employers.

Knowing this, one thing was clear -- we had to share this with our clinicians! Read on for Eleanor's tips on why you should create a standout personal description and how to do it in Nomad.




Why Is It Important to Create a Personal Description?

No matter what the profession, I’ve noticed one consistent trend when it comes to a job search:

When a candidate is able to clearly show experience, goals, and a knowledge of what they are looking for, the matching process is far more successful.

Outside of Nomad, employers usually get profile information through phone calls and emails. But that's not time or energy efficient for anyone. And sometimes -- let's face it, often -- important details get lost.

At Nomad, we’ve solved this problem by building a self-description feature directly into our product. In just a few short sentences you’re able to directly deliver key information to potential employers.

Some clinicians tend to overlook personal descriptions in their profile, since it is optional. However, by including a strong personal description, you've not only made it easier for an employer to get to know you quickly, but you've also set yourself apart by putting in the extra effort.


How Do You Add a Personal Description?

First, if you haven't already, make sure you've joined Nomad for free as either a doctor or a nurse. Then follow these quick steps:

  • Go to the “Edit Profile” section on your Profile page, and click the dropdown for “Personal Information.”

  • In the dropdown, you’ll then see a text box called “Description.” It’s right over the Profile Photo box.

  • Type a few descriptive sentences about who you are and what you’re looking for.

What you write to describe yourself can easily make you stand out to medical employers, since so many clinicians leave this field blank.



What Should You Say in Your Personal Description?

Now that you’ve found the description box, the million dollar question is of course what to say. Here are five actions to take:


1. Use Your Training and Specialty to Show That You're a Fit for the Role

You’ve worked very hard to get to where you are, so make sure potential employers know what you can do! Sharing your background and skill sets doesn't just help you look good, it also provides potential employers with valuable data to help them think about how you can fit into the role in question--or (and this is important) even other positions they haven't posted yet.


2. Be Specific About the Type of Work You Are Looking for

Inpatient and outpatient, clinic, hospital, private practice, telehealth--there are many different ways to provide care, so the more specific you are about what works for you, the better. A few questions to ask yourself may be:

  • Are you willing to travel, and if so how far?
  • What schedule best suits you? Seven days on or a regular nine-to-five?
  • Have you considered spending some time delivering care in underserved areas?

Being upfront about the environments that fit you best will greatly speed up your matching. It will not only cut down of offers that you don’t want, but also help employers get a sense of your range, availability, and who you are.


3. Detail Your Years of Experience

Employers will be hiring for a variety of different levels, and it’s only natural that your years of experience will influence what positions you qualify for. Make sure to highlight how many years you’ve been working and where you spent that time. This will give potential employers a good grasp on whether you’re a fit to fill a more senior department head position, or one where you can gain more experience first.


4. Mention Any Additional Training and Areas of Focus That Interest You

This category includes a few different bits of information. The answers to some of these questions are optional and some are actually necessary to show that you can actually fulfill a position.

  • Are you Board Certified or Eligible? Make sure to mention if you plan to take the boards or are unable to do so.

  • Are you a newer doctor? Employers will want to know if you intend to continue on with your training from residency to fellowship. This gives clarity on your availability in the short term.

  • Are you interested in other areas of work? It doesn’t hurt to list these, and you never know if it may open new doors for you to explore a new path.



5. Don't Feel Awkward About Spelling out a Specific Pay Rate!

If a certain number is not going to meet your requirements, it’s best for all parties to know this upfront. That way the matches or opportunities you hear from will be ones that you’ll actually consider. On the flip side, if you like an opportunity so much that you’d consider taking a pay cut, say that too.


Do You Have Examples of Great Personal Descriptions?

Of course! I’ve included a few examples below to spark your creativity. Feel free to use them as templates for your own profile.

Example 1:

Example 2:

Example 3:



I hope these tips help all clinicians to stand out during their job search and eventually, land the job of their dreams!

Remember, we’re here to help, so please do reach out at support@nomadhealth.com if you have questions or want additional tips!